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What does it mean “AABB certified or AABB accredited”?
How accurate is the DNA paternity test?
How old does a child need to be to perform a DNA paternity test?
What is a buccal swab and is it as accurate as blood?
What happens to my DNA samples once the test is complete?
What happens to the test samples (cheek swabs or blood) after the test?
How long does it take to get the results?
Can my results be used in court?
What do I need to bring to the appointment?
Is paternity testing covered by health insurance or Medicaid?
What is a “chain of custody”?

What does it mean “AABB certified or AABB accredited”?

AABB is an abbreviation for American Association of Blood Banks. AABB is the main accreditation body for parentage and relationship testing. We are certified by AABB to perform parentage and relationship testing and continuously participate in and successfully complete external proficiency testing programs required by the AABB and administered by the College of American Pathologists (CAP). Operation of our Quality Assurance program in accordance with the guidelines established by these national organizations means that you will receive the highest levels of quality, accuracy, service and security for your genetic testing needs.

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How accurate is the DNA paternity test?

DNA testing is the most accurate method available for determining paternity. Its power lies in the ability to trace the pattern of inheritance for separate regions of the genetic material (chromosomes). From this information, a probability of paternity can be calculated. This number can reach 99.99999% or more in some cases.

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How old does a child need to be to perform a DNA paternity test?

A newborn infant can be tested. Taking a sample with a buccal swab is painless, and is not traumatic for the child.

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What is a buccal swab and is it as accurate as blood?

 A buccal swab is soft and resembles a large Q-Tip. It is used to collect a sample of cheek cells by simply rubbing the inside of the cheeks. It is as accurate as blood, as a person’s   DNA is the same. Buccal swabs are particularly preferable over blood samples for persons who have had recent blood transfusions or bone marrow transplant as their blood samples may contain DNA from the donors.

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What happens to my DNA samples once the test is complete?

 We keep your extracted DNA sample for 6 months.

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What happens to the test samples (cheek swabs or blood) after the test?

 We keep test sample for 5 years in case more testing is required in the future.

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How long does it take to get the results?

We guarantee to have the results ready with in one to two weeks. Rush testing can be performed for additional fee. Call our office for a price quote.

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Can my results be used in court?

Results from our laboratory are admissible in Court of Law.

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What do I need to bring to the appointment?

All adult test participants must bring a valid government issued photo ID such as a driver’s license, state ID, military ID, or passport to the sample collection appointment. For minors, a birth certificate, Social Security card, or hospital birth record is sufficient. In addition, the child’s legal custodian will have to sign a consent form allowing the minor to be tested.  top of page Is paternity testing covered by health insurance or Medicaid? Paternity testing is not considered to be a medically necessary procedure; therefore, it is not covered by health insurance or Medicaid.  

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Is paternity testing covered by health insurance or Medicaid?

Paternity testing is not considered to be a medically necessary procedure; therefore, it is not covered by health insurance or Medicaid.

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What is a “chain of custody”?

The Chain of Custody is a documentation process required to make the DNA test results legally admissible (accepted by many courts and other government agencies). The Chain of Custody assures the court and other government agencies involved in the case that: 

  • Samples are collected by a neutral third party, such as a clinic or laboratory
  • The individuals tested are positively identified (i.e. they present a government-issued ID and are photographed.).
  • The samples are carefully tracked throughout the DNA testing process.

To maintain Chain of Custody in a case, each tested party is asked to complete a Client Identification and Consent Form. The legal guardian of a minor should sign the minor’s consent form.

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